Victims, Witnesses, and Defendants with Mental Illness or Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

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Authors: Arc, NAMI, PCE

Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) or mental illness are overrepresented in the criminal justice system, as victims, witnesses, suspects, and defendants. In an effort to inform prosecutors’ strategies when working with these individuals, PCE, in collaboration with the Arc and NAMI, has developed this guide. 

Innovative Prosecutor Programs

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Authors: PCE and Sarah Solano Geisler

Innovative programs described in these state-level papers funded by the DOJ’s Office of Justice Programs are newly developed initiatives undertaken by an office in keeping with its unique resources and the needs of its community. We seek to highlight those offices that are embracing their new role by working within their capacity to bring effective and proactive programs to their communities.

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Facial Recognition Technology: Where Will It Take Us?

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Author(s): Kristine Hamann and Rachel Smith

Technology is expanding, evolving, and improving at an explosive rate. Society, including law enforcement, is struggling to keep pace with these seemingly daily developments. This paper addresses facial recognition technology used by law enforcement to enhance surveillance capabilities and the associated legal issues it raises.

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Investigating Violent Crime: The Prosecutor’s Role – Lessons Learned From the Field

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Author(s): Kristine Hamann, PCE and John Delaney

Violent crime prosecutors do difficult and important work. In October 2017, fifteen seasoned violent-crime prosecutors spent a day and a half sharing their ideas about how to improve the investigation of violent crimes at a meeting sponsored by the Bureau of Justice Assistance of the U.S. Department of Justice. Though the group had much in common, it was quickly apparent that there are a variety of approaches to their work.

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Police Body-Worn Cameras: What Prosecutors Need to Know

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Author(s): Kristine Hamann, PCE

As police departments across the United States embrace the use of police body-worn cameras (“BWCs”), it is imperative that prosecutors be involved in the uptake process as early as possible. The cameras will inevitably capture a great deal of evidentiary material that will be used in every type of criminal prosecution. Thus, systems and policies must be developed to ensure that this evidence is properly captured and delivered to the prosecutor in a timely and usable way.

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